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The New York Times — A Museum About Rights, and a Legacy of Uncomfortable Canadian Truths

 
Photo Credit: Aaron Vincent Elkaim for The New York Times

Photo Credit: Aaron Vincent Elkaim for The New York Times

 
As a Jew, I see my history acknowledged, but as an indigenous person, I see my history left up to debate.
— Leah Gazan

WINNIPEG, Manitoba — The Canadian Museum for Human Rights offers many opportunities for contemplation. A glass display case holds the bloodstained salwar kameez worn by Malala Yousafzai, the activist for girls’ education in Pakistan, during an assassination attempt by the Taliban. Video testimonials from survivors of the genocides in Rwanda, Ukraine and Bosnia aim to teach tolerance.

Or one can think about the fact — unmentioned by the museum — that the water flowing through its reflection pools comes from a lake on an aboriginal reserve where residents have not had safe drinking water for almost two decades.

“It’s the Great Canadian Myth on display,” Leah Gazan, an indigenous rights activist, said during a recent visit to the museum.

 
 

Source

Levin, D. (2018, January 20). A Museum About Rights, and a Legacy of Uncomfortable Canadian Truths. Retrieved January 13, 2019, from https://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/06/world/americas/winnipeg-canadian-museum-for-human-rights.html

 
ArticleKarl Patton